Author Topic: Stock Suspension Set Up  (Read 6367 times)

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  • Offline YoungF   gb

      #10

    Offline YoungF

    • MTS 950 Pro
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    • Bike: was 950S now V4S
    • Town / City: North Yorkshire
    Re: Stock Suspension Set Up
    Reply #10 on: September 11, 2019, 05:49:44 pm
    September 11, 2019, 05:49:44 pm
    *Originally Posted by ducati_al [+]
    I'm running 36 clicks of rear preload solo, and between 44 clicks (wife xxKg) to 50 clicks (son 90Kg) two up.  I leave the compression at 1.25 and rebound at 6 clicks out solo, winding in the rebound one or two clicks when two up.  Seems to work OK, but I will take it to my suspension specialist in due course for a full setup, and if necessary I'll have it re-sprung for my weight/use.  Do other folks think the rear could be under-sprung?

    This is interesting, I didn't think the clicks count went that high, I can only assume I ended up running much higher rear pre-load towards the end of ownership as I definitely maxed out. The 950S goes to 30 and I'm on that for 2 up with luggage. Worth changing the spring just to get a red one....

  • Offline YoungF   gb

      #11

    Offline YoungF

    • MTS 950 Pro
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    Re: Stock Suspension Set Up
    Reply #11 on: September 11, 2019, 08:32:44 pm
    September 11, 2019, 08:32:44 pm
    *Originally Posted by Conman [+]
    I'm afraid I don't understand. Decreasing pre-load does not reduce travel, it increases travel because the springs are effectively softer. It also increases the length of the forks because the springs are longer, which will tend to reduce steering turn in. Adjusting compression and rebound will not really affect dive unless you hit the brakes like an emergency stop, and then only for a few seconds  :086:

    To clarify, it reduces compression travel as a proportion of overall travel.
    It reduces the length of the forks from a steering geometry perspective because the bike is sitting lower on the springs, combined with increased preload at the rear this increases the speed of the steering.
    Brake dive is the fork compressing too quick, increasing compression damping slows that down.

    Suspension settings and the resulting feel of the bike is a very personal thing. All credit to Ducati for providing the ability to adjust everything, not like the old days of putting coins in the tops and changing oil grades.

    I have always preferred a compliant front end and the adjustments I did worked for me, creating a much plusher ride, reducing fork pogoing when pulling up to junctions and also virtually eliminating those slow speed wobbles, but each to their own.

    YoungF


  • Offline bmw_al   gb

      #12

    Offline bmw_al

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    Re: Stock Suspension Set Up
    Reply #12 on: September 12, 2019, 07:41:05 am
    September 12, 2019, 07:41:05 am
    From memory, the rear preload adjustment  range is 55 clicks, where 2 clicks = 1 turn

  • Offline Stavross   gb

    • MTS 950 Member  ‐    44
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      #13

    Offline Stavross

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    Re: Stock Suspension Set Up
    Reply #13 on: June 16, 2020, 08:51:16 pm
    June 16, 2020, 08:51:16 pm
    Bit confusing all this suspension every one keeps saying clicks on front preload there are no clicks itís rotations of the big 13 mm nuts preload is clocks in the rear yes but from 0 to 55 range

  • Offline Stavross   gb

    • MTS 950 Member  ‐    44
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      #14

    Offline Stavross

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    Re: Stock Suspension Set Up
    Reply #14 on: June 16, 2020, 08:55:00 pm
    June 16, 2020, 08:55:00 pm
    Thereís no way you can get the normal required sag on the front of this bike due to so much travel all you can do is set preload for use of around 30 percent of total travel Iíve got 3an a half turns out now and rider say is about 56 mm I was hoping for 51 mm 30 % of 170 but Iíll see how it goes come and rebound front I e left at standard Iíll tweak at next ride turned rear preload way up to leave 15 mm of static sag rebound doesnít seem to make much difference so left in the middle of the clicks 25 I total

  • Offline sbtgn1   il

    • MTS 950 Member  ‐    11
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      #15

    Offline sbtgn1

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    Re: Stock Suspension Set Up
    Reply #15 on: July 10, 2020, 06:53:52 am
    July 10, 2020, 06:53:52 am
    i am 95kg without gear , i was able to reach 56mm both in fornt and back ,  for rear preload i am on 22 out of skyhook 24 and in front i am on 2 turns out from full in.

  • Offline nasher75   us

    • MTS 950 Junior  ‐    9
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      #16

    Offline nasher75

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    Re: Stock Suspension Set Up
    Reply #16 on: October 22, 2021, 01:57:31 pm
    October 22, 2021, 01:57:31 pm
    I'm wondering if you guys are accounting for static sag in the front end.  I was confused as to why I was harshly bottoming out the front, but when off the bike, I was only measuring 5" to the cable tie and our forks are supposed to have 6.7" of travel.  So, I slid the cable tie up to the top of the stanchion, lifted the front end of the bike until the wheel came off the ground and had my wife measure the distance from bottom of fork tube to cable tie and it was 1.7".  That means this pig has 43mm of static sag.  Keep in mind that this measurement was also taken with the front preload bolt wound in full to stop.

    I can only assume that the progressive portion of the spring on the front is fully compressed under just the weight of the bike.  That is a complete waste of the travel they are claiming this bike has.  Will only extend if you get airborne and then provides no support when you land, only to blow through all the travel when the wheel touches down.

    Sorry, but they did very little to develop the suspension on this model.  Maybe be it's better on the 1200's, but I'm pretty unimpressed with my 950S suspension.  The skyhook is doing nothing if the spring able to keep you in midstroke, both front and rear.  Also, progressive springs are just a band aid for poorly designed suspension.

    I know it's not possible to have a coil suspension that will accommodate all rider weights and account for passengers and gear, but I'm bottoming out harshly on rough roads with just me.  No passenger and no luggage.
    Hunt Hard, Kill Swiftly, Waste Nothing, Offer No Apologies...

  • Offline sbtgn1   il

    • MTS 950 Member  ‐    11
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      #17

    Offline sbtgn1

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    Re: Stock Suspension Set Up
    Reply #17 on: October 26, 2021, 06:24:25 am
    October 26, 2021, 06:24:25 am
    i had a static sag of roughly 10mm , you need to remember that testing static sag should be done by first opening the shocks to their fullest and than carefully placing the bike down to its own weight , if you test static sag after seating on it , than the shock might not come back to its static sag due to friction, so you can average those numbers , if they are far apart than there is an issue with the shocks.

     


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